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Snow day solution: Recipes to get kids cooking

No matter how fervently kids pray for a snow day, smuggling spoons into the freezer and other acts of juvenile juju, they almost always end up making parents wish the school buses had all-wheel drive.

"I'm bored."

Really? Then get cooking. Here's some recipes that children can make, with adults hovering, and handling knives if necessary. Most use fairly common ingredients, but one or two dishes are worth a grocery store run, if possible.

Sure, you'll have to supervise and probably clean up. But the little dears have to be fed and watered anyway. And when they go back to class they can talk about the lesson they wouldn't have learned at school.

Chocolate chip cookies rule on snow days. Alton Brown offers thin, puffy and chewy recipes. Peanut butter cookies aren't too shabby either, and these don't even need flour.

Scones are the subject in today's Taste section, with veteran scone maker Jackie Masters sharing recipes and techniques.

Gingerbread also makes the house smell heavenly, and if you're up for decorating gingerbread persons, you've got them busy all day.

Cheese puffs, which the French call gougeres, are an amazing, crispy snack made from only flour, eggs, butter and cheese. (Plus water, salt and pepper, and if you like, mustard and scallions.)

The way they puff up and crispify makes them an awesome science experiment that happens to taste terrific.

For dinner:

Pot roast, beef chuck seasoned, seared and braised to fork-tender, takes three or four hours in the oven or stovetop. But it's the most tantalizing home aromatherapy generator ever, and by the time dinner's ready they'll be famished.

Three simple pasta dishesfrom Mark Bittman at The New York Times. If you have garlic, eggs, olive oil and spaghetti, you're in.

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Food and Drink
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