Skip to primary navigation Skip to main content

Voters say Albany corruption a "very serious'' problem; Cuomo dips again

By Tom Precious

ALBANY -- About a third of New Yorkers believe their own state senator or member of the Assembly could be arrested for corruption, and 81 percent overall believe the handcuffs will be coming out again for some legislator before too long, a new poll has found.

The Siena College poll released this morning, coming weeks after two downstate state lawmakers were busted in separate corruption cases, said voters believe federal prosecutors and Attorney General Eric Schneiderman -- not Gov. Andrew Cuomo or district attorneys -- would be best in trying to reduce corruption at the Capitol.

In all, 91 percent believe corruption in the Legislature is a serious problem. Still, voters are statistically split, given the poll's margin of error, with an ever-so-slight edge among voters who believe most lawmakers are "honest and law-abiding.''

As for Cuomo, his favorability and job approval ratings continue to slide. He has seen the percentage of voters wanting him to run again drop from 62 percent last December to 53 percent in the new poll; 52 percent of upstate voters want someone else to run for governor, the poll found. The percentage of voters who give him a negative job approval rating has risen from 38 percent in December to 47 percent today.

In a sign of growing problems for his 2014 campaign, which he is hoping will be stronger than his first race as a way of showing national Democrats he can be a player in the 2016 presidential race, 59 percent of upstate voters and 55 percent as self-described independent voters gave him a negative job approval rating in the new poll.

tagged

Albany | Andrew Cuomo
comments powered by Disqus
Advertisement

About Politics Now

Robert J. McCarthy

Robert J. McCarthy

A native of Schenectady, Robert J. McCarthy came to The Buffalo News in 1982 following a six-year stint at the Olean Times Herald. He is a graduate of St. Bonaventure University, and has been covering local, state and national politics since 1992.

[email protected]


Tom Precious

Tom Precious

Tom Precious joined The Buffalo News in 1997 as bureau chief at the state Capitol, where he covers everything from statewide politics and state government fiscal affairs to health care, environmental and municipal government matters. Prior to The News, he worked for news outlets in Albany and Washington, DC.

[email protected]


Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri is an Amherst native and has covered politics and government in upstate New York since 2003. She joined The Buffalo News in 2012 and covers City Hall.

@jillterreri | [email protected]


Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski, The Buffalo News Washington bureau chief, has reported from the nation's capital since 1989 after joining The News as a business reporter in 1984. A graduate of Syracuse University, Zremski is a former Nieman fellow in journalism at Harvard University. In 2007, he served as president of the National Press Club.

@JerryZremski | [email protected]

Subscribe

Advertisement