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Conservative Party outlines casino opposition

By Tom Precious

ALBANY -- The state Conservative Party is just one of the groups pushing against a plan by Gov. Andrew Cuomo and lawmakers to dramatically expand casino gambling in New York. The proposal is on the November ballot for voters statewide to consider. Besides opposing the growth of gambling, the party also characterizes as "deceptive'' the rosy wording of the casino amendment on the ballot.

Here is the party's official take out this morning on the proposed change to the state constitution allowing up to seven new casinos in the state:

The Conservative Party recommends a NO vote on Proposal Number One.

The proposed amendment to section 9 of article 1 of the Constitution would allow the Legislature to authorize up to seven casinos in New York State for the legislated purposes of promoting job growth, increasing aid to schools, and permitting local governments to lower property tax es through revenues generated. Shall the amendment be approved?

The Conservative Party of New York State, since its inception in 1962, has promoted job growth through lower taxes, encouraged localities to lower taxes and believe that schools should provi de a solid education for our youth. The Conservative Party has been consistent in its legislative program calling for the need to reduce taxes and promote job growth and has stressed if we fail to provide jobs and remain a high tax state, we will lose our citizens to states with less taxes.

The proposed amendment, while it paints a rosy picture, will not accomplish the stated goal. Casino gambling will produce new problems as evidenced in the areas where casino s are currently located. In 1966, the Legislature told New York citizens, if they approved the Lottery, their school taxes would be reduced. Every year school taxes go up, despite the millions people spend on lottery tickets. It is time to close the money spigot that gives the Legislature more money to spend.

 

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Albany | Andrew Cuomo
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About Politics Now

Robert J. McCarthy

Robert J. McCarthy

A native of Schenectady, Robert J. McCarthy came to The Buffalo News in 1982 following a six-year stint at the Olean Times Herald. He is a graduate of St. Bonaventure University, and has been covering local, state and national politics since 1992.

rmccarthy@buffnews.com


Tom Precious

Tom Precious

Tom Precious joined The Buffalo News in 1997 as bureau chief at the state Capitol, where he covers everything from statewide politics and state government fiscal affairs to health care, environmental and municipal government matters. Prior to The News, he worked for news outlets in Albany and Washington, DC.

tprecious@buffnews.com


Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri is an Amherst native and has covered politics and government in upstate New York since 2003. She joined The Buffalo News in 2012 and covers City Hall.

@jillterreri | jterreri@buffnews.com


Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski, The Buffalo News Washington bureau chief, has reported from the nation's capital since 1989 after joining The News as a business reporter in 1984. A graduate of Syracuse University, Zremski is a former Nieman fellow in journalism at Harvard University. In 2007, he served as president of the National Press Club.

@JerryZremski | jzremski@buffnews.com

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