Skip to primary navigation Skip to main content

Video: Week in Washington - The 'fiscal cliff'

Washington Bureau Chief Jerry Zremski has several in-depth stories in the works about the "fiscal cliff" and what it all means for Western New Yorkers.

 

Video: Kevin Walter on endorsements

Kevin Walter, The News' deputy editorial page editor, spoke this afternoon with Brian Meyer about how the paper goes about making its decisions and about the potential effects of the endorsements it makes:

Video: Jerry Zremski reports from Chicago

News Washington Bureau Chief Jerry Zremski spoke earlier this afternoon with Brian Meyer about Barack Obama's chances and other topics. Here's what they had to say:

Video: Siena pollster Steve Greenberg

Siena pollster Steve Greenberg spoke earlier today with Brian Meyer. Here is their conversation:

Bring your comments and questions to our Election Day chat

The Buffalo News and BuffaloNews.com will have all the issues and races covered on Election Day from the minute you wake up until the results unfold.

Starting at 10 a.m. Tuesday, we'll have a live chat with guests to talk about the important issues, key races and the latest updates from across Western New York. Reporters Mary Pasciak and Patrick Lakamp will be your hosts. We'll also bring you insight from Political Reporter Bob McCarthy and Columnist Donn Esmonde. Here's what we have so far in terms of guests:

*10 a.m.: Reporter Gene Warner on what early-morning voters were saying at the polls

*10:30 a.m.: Deputy Managing Editor Stan Evans on what to watch for throughout the day

*11 a.m.: Washington Columnist Doug Turner on the national scene

*12 p.m.: Turner and Managing Editor Brian Connolly open it up for a discussion with readers

*1:10 p.m.: Health Reporter Henry Davis on health care issues

*1:40 p.m.: Business Editor Grove Potter on economic issues

*2:10 p.m.: Siena Research Institute pollster Steven A. Greenberg

*2:40 p.m.: Editorial Page Editor John Neville on The Buffalo News' endorsement process

*3:10 p.m.: Reporter Dan Herbeck on the Seneca Nation elections

*3:40 p.m.: Washington Bureau Chief Jerry Zremski reports from Chicago

*4:10 p.m.: Buffalo News Editor Mike Connelly gives a Florida perspective

*4:40 p.m.: Reporter Jay Rey from the swing state of Ohio

*4:55 p.m.: Reporter Matt Glynn on local town board upsizing votes

*5:10 p.m.: Reporter Barbara O'Brien on area State Assembly races

*5:40 p.m.: Reporter Sandra Tan on the Erie County comptroller's race

*6:10 p.m.: Rochester D&C Reporter Jessica Alaimo on the Slaughter-Brooks race

*6:25 p.m.: Reporter Thomas J. Prohaska on the Witryol-Maziarz State Senate race

*6:40 p.m.: Reporter Denise Jewell Gee on the Collins-Hochul race

*7:10 p.m.: Reporter Charity Vogel on the Grisanti-Amodeo-Swanick race

*7:40 p.m.: Reporter Tom Precious reports from Boston

*8 p.m.: Metro Columnist Donn Esmonde chimes in

*8:30 p.m.: Political Reporter Bob McCarthy

We've also got a live video broadcast starting at noon. Check out that schedule.

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog, you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading this week:

"'Moneyball' Godfather Bill James Tackles Politics In Super PAC Age," Sam Stein, Huffington Post. The "high priest of baseball number-crunching" has turned his attention to political campaign fundraising. 

"A Senate Primary Stuck in the Shadows," Thomas Kaplan, New York Times. A Republican primary for U.S. Senate later this month isn't drawing much attention. The winner faces Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand.

"Absent an actual Dream Act, Obama relaxes deportation requirements," Reid Pillifant, Capital New York. Before a speech to a major Latino group, President Obama changes immigration policy. It doesn't grant citizenship, but it defers deportation.

"Cuomo says final decisions on hydrofracking in New York remain undecided," Teri Weaver, the Post-Standard. Gov. Andrew Cuomo is weighing the desires of local communities when it comes to hydraulic fracturing. 

Photo gallery, Washington Post. In honor of Father's Day, historian Douglas Brinkley looks at presidential fathers - the good and the not so good. 

 

Video: McCarthy on 'Obama factor' affecting N.Y. Senate race

The Read: What they're saying about WNY

From Kathy Hochul to Carl Paladino, and from hydrofracking to school aid, people and policies tied to Western New York made news elsewhere this week. Here's a roundup of some political headlines from outside the area.

Politico was one of many national outlets that picked up on the story of Rep. Kathy Hochul and her comments about her rationale for supporting President Obama's contraception mandate. (Our Washington Bureau Chief Jerry Zremski tackled it here.) "Freshman New York Rep. Kathy Hochul is getting a taste of the feverish town hall angst that boiled up and over in 2010," writes Politico's David Catanese -- Hochul feels wrath of the town hall, Feb. 28

Carl Paladino's run for governor was a teachable moment, at least in one way, for Republicans in Onondaga County, according to Capital Tonight. County GOP Chairman Tom Dadey said he is looking for a greater share of the weighted vote at the state Republican convention. “The next time we run a gubernatorial candidate against the Democrats, we’re going to run somebody from Onondaga County,” Liz Benjamin quotes Dadey as saying. “A lot of people voted for Carl Paladino -– all walks of life -– on the Republican line -– and Erie County is the largest county.”-- Erie County Envy, Feb. 28

The New York Daily News' Daily Politics blog notes that New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg announced his support for hydraulic fracturing -- but only in certain places in the state. "Bloomberg gave it a thumbs up –- so long as it is not near the New York City watershed or any of the vital conduits that bring water into the five boroughs," writes Glenn Bain. -- Mayor Bloomberg Supports Fracking Outside NYC Watershed, Feb. 29

Rochester officials want a boost in school aid from the state, bringing what the city receives more into line with what other places -- like Buffalo -- get. They've formed a new group called Building a Better Rochester to help their push. -- Mayor Richards, other Rochester leaders seek state aid parity, March 1

Live chat with Doug Turner at 1 p.m. before Obama's speech

Join The News' Washington columnist, Doug Turner, in a discussion leading up to President Obama's speech this afternoon on debt reduction. Turner will continue with analysis during the speech and more discussion afterward.

Minor candidates make presence known in race for Lee's old seat

Today was a day for minor party candidates to weigh in to the developing race for the vacancy in the 26th Congressional District, with Tea Party candidate Jack Davis leading the way.

Davis, who has promised to spend $3 milion of his own money in his fourth bid for the seat, said he will not contest the designating petitions of another minor party candidate -- David Bellavia. He called on Republican Jane L. Corwin, a Clarence assemblywoman, to also refrain from challenging the efforts of the Batavia veteran of the Iraq War to qualify for the ballot.

"David Bellavia has more than earned his place on the ballot," Davis said. "The Jack Davis campaign will not challenge the nominating petitions David Bellavia has filed. Jane Corwin should do the same.

"The Corwin campaign should stop trying to keep David Bellavia off the ballot," he said. "She should do the right thing, and, as our campaign does, respect David’s defense of democracy and respect the wishes of the people of this district to have a fair and open election."

The Corwin campaign did not immediately respond to the Davis challenge, while a spokesman for Democrat Kathleen C. Hochul said she has no plans to challenge the petitions.

Bellavia, meanwhile, who has applied for his own line for the May 24 special election, issued one of his first public comments of the campaign by questioning the U.S. military role in Libya.

"When a president is so detached from vital world affairs, so intent on fiddling while the Middle East burns, I know it is time to act. We need a House of Representatives that will push President Obama even harder to lead -- not follow -- in global affairs," Bellavia siad.

"My opponents Jane Corwin and Kathy Hochul have been silent on foreign policy, perhaps because they have never traveled to another country except as tourists. I have seen the world as it really is, and I believe the United States should lead the world’s democracies in supporting freedom and democracy in Libya and other Middle Eastern nations," he added. "We should be helping Libyan citizens remove the brutal Qaddafi regime, but we cannot stop there. We need to ensure that after Qaddafi’s departure, adequate planning and resources are available to establish freedom and civil rights for the citizens of Libya."

--Robert J. McCarthy
 

« Older Entries
Advertisement

About Politics Now

Robert J. McCarthy

Robert J. McCarthy

A native of Schenectady, Robert J. McCarthy came to The Buffalo News in 1982 following a six-year stint at the Olean Times Herald. He is a graduate of St. Bonaventure University, and has been covering local, state and national politics since 1992.

rmccarthy@buffnews.com


Tom Precious

Tom Precious

Tom Precious joined The Buffalo News in 1997 as bureau chief at the state Capitol, where he covers everything from statewide politics and state government fiscal affairs to health care, environmental and municipal government matters. Prior to The News, he worked for news outlets in Albany and Washington, DC.

tprecious@buffnews.com


Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri is an Amherst native and has covered politics and government in upstate New York since 2003. She joined The Buffalo News in 2012 and covers City Hall.

@jillterreri | jterreri@buffnews.com


Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski, The Buffalo News Washington bureau chief, has reported from the nation's capital since 1989 after joining The News as a business reporter in 1984. A graduate of Syracuse University, Zremski is a former Nieman fellow in journalism at Harvard University. In 2007, he served as president of the National Press Club.

@JerryZremski | jzremski@buffnews.com

Subscribe

Advertisement