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The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog, you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading this week:

"'Moneyball' Godfather Bill James Tackles Politics In Super PAC Age," Sam Stein, Huffington Post. The "high priest of baseball number-crunching" has turned his attention to political campaign fundraising. 

"A Senate Primary Stuck in the Shadows," Thomas Kaplan, New York Times. A Republican primary for U.S. Senate later this month isn't drawing much attention. The winner faces Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand.

"Absent an actual Dream Act, Obama relaxes deportation requirements," Reid Pillifant, Capital New York. Before a speech to a major Latino group, President Obama changes immigration policy. It doesn't grant citizenship, but it defers deportation.

"Cuomo says final decisions on hydrofracking in New York remain undecided," Teri Weaver, the Post-Standard. Gov. Andrew Cuomo is weighing the desires of local communities when it comes to hydraulic fracturing. 

Photo gallery, Washington Post. In honor of Father's Day, historian Douglas Brinkley looks at presidential fathers - the good and the not so good. 

 

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog, you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading this week:

16 worst political dirty tricks," Politico. Take a look back at American political history –- in pictures -- of a variety of allegations and schemes devised to help get people elected. From Garfield and van Buren to Koch and Cuomo to Bush and Gore.

"Peeling the Onion," by Morgan Pehme, City & State. Comedian Joe Randazzo dishes to City & State as he leaves his post as editor in chief of The Onion. Randazzo explains what makes politics so funny and why Gov. Andrew Cuomo isn't.

"Gambling Group Gave $2 Million to a Cuomo Ally," by Nicholas Confessore, Danny Hakim and Charles V. Bagli, The New York Times. The New York Times revealed Monday that gambling interests steered $2 million to a group allied with Gov. Andrew Cuomo as the governor was developing his proposal to expand casino gambling.

"Casinos Wagered Early on Cuomo," by Jacob Gershman and Eliot Brown, The Wall Street Journal. A fundraiser at a Westchester home in October gave executives from the gambling conglomerate Genting the chance to personally pitch their plans for a Queens casino to Gov. Andrew Cuomo in October, the Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog, you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading the last couple weeks:

"Sources: Cuomo tried to keep New York public labor heads off DNC delegate list,"  by Maggie Haberman, Politico. Gov. Andrew Cuomo has not been shy in his battles with public employee unions. But for someone who will need labor’s support should he be serious about a 2016 national run, this story depicts a Democrat who does not play well in the sandbox with others.

The Legislative Correspondents Association show was held a couple weeks back –- an annual politician-mocking gig put on by some current and former reporters who cover the state Capitol. Politicians get their turn, too, and here is the video put together by Sen. Michael Gianaris, the Queens Democrat in charge of trying to take back the Senate from Republicans this fall. Most Senate Democrats may not be willing to publicly state their anger with Democratic Gov. Andrew Cuomo for signing a redistricting bill intended to help Republicans, but this video makes the point -– in rather not-so-subtle ways. Note: if you don’t want to hear a profanity, turn your sound down when former U.S. Sen. Al D’Amato appears.

“White House visitor logs provide window into lobbying industry,” by T.W. Farnam, Washington Post. President Obama, more than any other president before him, vowed to “change the political culture that has fueled the influence of lobbyists,” Farnam writes. But access to 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. and senior administration officials is still clearly available.

"Republicans in NY: lame in lower house," by Ken Hall, Times Herald-Record. Buffalo developer Carl Paladino, as he is also doing in Western New York, is getting involved in a race for the State Legislature in Albany. Paladino is backing Colin Schmitt, one of two candidates "of the new GOP generation" seeking the 99th Assembly District seat.

Five Questions with Patrick Gallivan

Every Sunday, we'll publish a quick Q&A with someone from the local political world. Instead of touching on the latest in policy issues and proposed legislation, the intent is to catch a glimpse of the person behind the title. The interviews are done via email.

Gallivan
State Senator Patrick M. Gallivan speaks during the Western New York Chamber Alliance's state legislative forum in February. (Photo by Charles Lewis / Buffalo News)

Patrick M. Gallivan

The basics
Age: 51
Job title: State senator, 59th district
Family: Married to the love of my life, Mary Pat Gallivan; reside with our children, Jenna, 27, and Conor, 19.
Education: Bachelor's degree from Canisius College, 1982; master's degree from SUNY Albany, 1992.
Party affiliation: Republican
Previous work experience: New York state trooper; Erie County Sheriff; member of New York State Board of Parole; president of GDY Professional Investigations.
State salary: $79,500

Continue reading "Five Questions with Patrick Gallivan" »

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog, you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading this week:

"O'Malley builds on tax-raising legacy," by Annie Linskey, Baltimore Sun. It's no secret that Gov. Andrew Cuomo is keeping an eye on Maryland Democratic Gov. Martin O'Malley as the two maneuver their national ambition machine. The two have taken different approaches on tax hikes. Cuomo had opposed them, but then OK'd a $2 billion tax hike on millionaires last December. O'Malley has not been shy about raising taxes -- something the liberal base of the Democratic Party, who dominate many presidential primary contests, do not abhor when the choice is between tax hikes or spending cuts. Here the Baltimore Sun looks at taxes and 2016.

"The politics of generating power — and winning it," by Martin Regg Cohn, Toronto Star. Cheap power generated at Niagara Falls has set off political battles on this side of the Canadian border, but politicians in Ontario have their own debates that swirl around the future of hydropower. Tim Hudak, a Fort Erie, Ont., native who started his career as a Peace Bridge customs officer, has floated a plan to sell off part of Ontario Power Generation and Hydro One to public pension funds. The proposal has gotten fierce reaction. "The latest Conservative plan to partially privatize Ontario's electrical utilities looks like a bigger publicity stunt than the Flying Wallenda's careful balancing act," writes Cohn, Queen's Park columnist for the paper.

"Romney, Obama campaign staffers debate an actual issue on Twitter," by Natalie Jennings, Washington Post. It's a political argument, no more than 140 characters at a time. Top aides to the former Massachusetts governor and the president "traded Twitter barbs" over jobs and the economy, Jennings writes.

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog, you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading this week:

"Obama sees a political charm in third visit," by Jimmy Vielkind, Albany Times-Union. Not once, not twice, but 24 times. That's how many times President Barack Obama has visited New York State since he's been in office, including his 2010 swing through Buffalo, Vielkind notes.

"For Obama and Cuomo, no bunny suits," by Larry Rulison, Albany Times-Union. Tyvek "bunny suits" were notably absent when President Barack Obama and Gov. Andrew Cuomo took a short tour of a clean room at a computer chip factor at Albany College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering this week, Rulison notes in a piece that explains how the factory worked around the precaution.

Drilling Decisions – Cuomo’s green reputation hinges on hydrofracking decision,” by Jon Lentz, City & State. Even though the bar set by his predecessors isn’t very high, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo’s environmental legacy could come down to what the state does with regulating hydraulic fracturing, writes Lentz.

"Change is good; bureaucracy is not," by Glens Falls Post-Star. Gov. Andrew Cuomo's idea to create a new state agency to serve as a watchdog against abuse of disabled people under the state's care is already getting its rush of backing from legislators. But the Glens Falls Post-Star, seeming to recall campaign promises by Cuomo about shrinking the size of state government, calls for pause. 

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading in recent weeks:

"Part-Time Required Hours For Some Full-Time Legislative Staffers," by Kenneth Lovett, the New York Daily News' Daily Politics blog. Calling it one of Albany's "dirty little secrets," Lovett writes that part-timers are raking in the dough while being left with time that can be used for campaign work and other jobs.

"Hillary Clinton would crush Gov. Andrew Cuomo in a presidential race," by Kenneth Lovett, New York Daily News. When Gov. Andrew Cuomo was asked the day after this story if he had a reaction to the poll's findings, he had a rather simple response: "No.''

"Senate passes ed pork to Republican districts," by Jimmy Vielkind, Albany Times Union's Capitol Confidential. It's supposed to be the age of no budget pork. But what do you call aid that gets doled out only to partisan districts? Vielkind reports that Republicans in the State Senate pushed through $9.95 million in aid to schools in Republican districts this week, drawing complaints from their Democratic colleagues. Apparently, it's all within the rules.

"Andrew Cuomo vs. Hillary Clinton in 2016?'' by Maggie Haberman, Politco. It's going to be a long five years if this keeps up. Haberman writes Clinton, like Cuomo, is doing her own version of a 2016 White House dance.

“Twitter becomes a key real-time tool for campaigns,” by Karen Tumulty, Washington Post. This piece explores the use of Twitter through examples from both sides of the aisle in Washington, “showing how Twitter is redefining the means by which politicians shape, distribute and refine their messages.” Tumulty writes, “The six-year-old microblogging site came into its own this presidential cycle, but the past few weeks have demonstrated how clearly it has become the tool of choice for getting something into the political bloodstream …”

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading this week:

"How Does Press Irk Cuomo? Document Offers Clues," by Thomas Kaplan, New York Times. A document obtained by BuzzFeed last week provided an inside glimpse into the Cuomo administration's view of the press. The document was a markup of blog posts by YNN journalist Liz Benjamin that highlighted sections and labeled portions "generally snarky." A story in The New York Times notes that the document illustrates Cuomo's reputation as "sensitive to news coverage." One editor told the Times that the annotations were "bizarre."

"Cuomo spokesman: L’Affair Liz much ado about nothing," by Casey Seiler, Capitol Confidential. Seiler reports that the governor's spokesman called into Fred Dicker's radio show to address the governor's office's document involving a reporter's blog posts (see above). "Cuomo spokesman Josh Vlasto did his level best to tamp down any nefarious extrapolations," Seiler reports.

"Cuomo named to Time’s 100 most influential people," by Jimmy Vielkind, Capitol Confidential. Vielkind writes that Gov. Andrew Cuomo got a blurb in Time Magazine in its annual list. Cuomo's "in the company of Mark Zuckerberg and Hillary Clinton," Vielkind says of the piece.

And from late last week: "Cuomo's man Dicker to write Cuomo bio," by Dylan Byers at Politico. New York Post columnist Fred Dicker has the cooperation of Gov. Andrew Cuomo for a biography on the governor. "With few exceptions, Dicker, a Cuomo friendly, gets exclusive on-the-record access to the governor's thoughts" as the "so-called 'dean'" of Albany reporters, Byers writes.

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog you'll find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Here's a sampling of what they were reading this week:

-- "The nation’s 10 most popular governors — and why," by Aaron Blake, Washington Post's The Fix. When it comes to White House ruminations, Gov. Andrew Cuomo says his job right now is being governor. But that doesn't stop his campaign committee from reminding folks from time to time that 2016 is only a couple of political bus stops down the road. This week's Cuomo 2016 entry comes not from our eagle eyes, but courtesy of a "Dear Friend" email blast from the Andrew Cuomo Committee.

-- "Cuomo turns to Albany to stock his cabinet," by Kenneth Lovett, New York Daily News. Former Assemblyman Sam Hoyt is among a list of former lawmakers whose appointments to Cuomo's cabinet have raised eyebrows in political circles.

-- “Paladino hunger striker plans anti-mandate walkabout” by Casey Seiler, Albany Times Union. A Carl Paladino supporter -- who once picketed outside the studios of a Fox News host who wouldn’t have Paladino on the air -- is at it again. Tea Party activist Tom Cavanagh was looking last week for the media to take notice of a planned walk for mandate relief, Seiler writes on the Capitol Confidential blog.

-- "Chart of the Day: How the Rosen-Romney Feud Played Out on Twitter," by David A. Graham, The Atlantic. We all know about the 24-hour news cycle. But what about the Twitter news cycle? The Atlantic takes a look at the rise and fall of tweets-per-minute in the hours after Ann Romney took to Twitter to respond to Democratic strategist Hilary Rosen's comment that she had "never worked a day in her life."

The Read: Political chatter from elsewhere

Each Saturday on the Politics Now blog you will find a list of stories that caught the eyes of The News' political reporters. Over the last week, here is a sampling of what they were reading:

--"Redrawn Districts Present a Hurdle for Democrats" by Raymond Hernandez, New York Times. Reps. Kathy Hochul and Louise Slaughter top a list of New York Democrats that the NYT points out have suddenly found themselves on the defensive in districts "once considered safe for the party." A story that appeared in the Times on Monday pegged Hochul as "considered among the most vulnerable Democratic incumbents in New York."

--"Gov. Cuomo could be on collision course with Clintons in 2016 race for White House" by Kenneth Lovett, New York Daily News. It’s been whispered about for months: the political steamroller who could make Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s 2016 White House ambitions just a tad more difficult. And then former President Bill Clinton –- Cuomo’s onetime boss -– dropped the bomb the other day: He’d be “happy’’ if his wife, Hillary, ran for president in four years. A couple days after the former president’s shot-heard-around-Albany interview on Good Morning America, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi told a television interviewer that she would “love’’ to see Hillary Clinton run in 2016. [It’s noteworthy that Pelosi was a big booster of former Gov. Mario Cuomo during his past White House rumination days.]

--Check out Texts from Hillary, a Tumblr that juxtaposes pictures of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. Here's some insight on it from MSNBC's Helen A.S. Popkin.

--"Romney team in New York looks to deliver knockout primary blow to Rick Santorum" by Jason Horowitz, Washington Post. Horowitz writes that if Romney's wins in primaries earlier this week "served as a death sentence for Santorum’s campaign, New York promises to be the executioner."

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About Politics Now

Robert J. McCarthy

Robert J. McCarthy

A native of Schenectady, Robert J. McCarthy came to The Buffalo News in 1982 following a six-year stint at the Olean Times Herald. He is a graduate of St. Bonaventure University, and has been covering local, state and national politics since 1992.

rmccarthy@buffnews.com


Tom Precious

Tom Precious

Tom Precious joined The Buffalo News in 1997 as bureau chief at the state Capitol, where he covers everything from statewide politics and state government fiscal affairs to health care, environmental and municipal government matters. Prior to The News, he worked for news outlets in Albany and Washington, DC.

tprecious@buffnews.com


Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri

Jill Terreri is an Amherst native and has covered politics and government in upstate New York since 2003. She joined The Buffalo News in 2012 and covers City Hall.

@jillterreri | jterreri@buffnews.com


Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski

Jerry Zremski, The Buffalo News Washington bureau chief, has reported from the nation's capital since 1989 after joining The News as a business reporter in 1984. A graduate of Syracuse University, Zremski is a former Nieman fellow in journalism at Harvard University. In 2007, he served as president of the National Press Club.

@JerryZremski | jzremski@buffnews.com

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