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Check out the teacher ratings for your school

The state education commissioner and the governor have both put teacher evaluations front and center in their plans for reforming education in New York. Many millions of dollars for the Buffalo Public Schools ride on the district's ability to put together an evaluation system the state will approve.

There are plenty of important elements on both sides of the debate on teacher evaluations, and I hope to be able to touch on as many of them as possible in the coming days.

Today, I want to start off by addressing some of the anger that some teachers have expressed regarding the Buffalo News requesting public information about teacher evaluations.

What prompted the News to request the information?

Well, a few months ago, a teacher at one of the low-performing high schools contacted me with some concerns about the teacher evaluations in 2010-11. The teachers at the PLA schools, he had heard, were getting shafted on their evaluations. He wanted to know: was that true?

I had no idea.

But it seemed like a fair question to investigate.

So I did what seemed to make sense and asked the district for copies of all the teacher evaluations. If there were some inequity in how teachers were getting evaluated, that would be the way to prove or disprove it.

(I checked with Bob Freeman over at the state's Committee on Open Government, and he said there's no doubt that a teacher's overall rating is a matter of public record. But more on that another day.)

What did I find out from the district?

In most schools, all teachers were deemed "adequate." (On the existing evaluations, there are only two final determinations: "adequate" or "not adequate.") It's the principals, remember, who are doing the evaluations, which, in 2010-11, were based solely on classroom observations.

The school with the highest percentage of teachers rated inadequate was Hamlin Park, where one out of 10 teachers were rated inadequate. At Drew Science Magnet, 8 percent of teachers were rated inadequate. Early Childhood Center 17 and MLK each had 7 percent of teachers rated inadequate.

Most of the PLA (persistently lowest achieving) schools had a rather low percentage of teachers rated inadequate -- if any teachers at all were.

At the PLA high schools, for instance: Bennett and Burgard had 3 percent rated inadequate; Lafayette, East and South Park had none.

I'll be delving into this issue more in the coming days.

In the meantime, here's the raw info for you to digest a bit (ratings are from 2010-11):

School School name "Adequate" teachers "Not adequate" teachers Pct inadequate
3 D'Youville Porter 55
0%
6 BEST 66
0%
17 Early Childhd Ctr 17 41 3 7%
18 Pantoja 55 1 2%
19 Native Am Magnet 52
0%
27 Hillery Park 54
0%
30 Frank Sedita 74
0%
31 Harriett Ross Tubman 49
0%
32 Bennett Park 72
0%
33 Bilingual Center 33 56
0%
37 Futures Academy 65
0%
39 MLK 71 5 7%
42 Occupational Trng Ctr 26
0%
43 Lovejoy Discovery 52 1 2%
45 Intl School 45 106 1 1%
53 Community Sch 53 52
0%
54 Blackman 37
0%
59 Drew Science Magnet 36 3 8%
61 Early Childhd Ctr 61 35 1 3%
64 Olmsted 64 9
0%
65 Roosevelt 32
0%
66 North Park Middle 38 1 3%
67 Discovery 20
0%
69 Houghton 54 1 2%
72 Lorraine 52
0%
74 Hamlin Park 55 6 10%
76 Badillo 65
0%
79 Grabiarz 49 2 4%
80 Highgate Heights 43 0 0%
81 School 81 57 1 2%
82 Early Childhd Ctr 82 26
0%
84 Erie Co Health Ctr 21 1 5%
89 Wright 63 2 3%
90 Drew ECC 90 36 2 5%
91 BUILD 56 1 2%
93 Southside 90 1 1%
94 West Hertel 61
0%
95 Waterfront 72
0%
96 Campus West 72
0%
97 Austin 42 1 2%
99 Makowski 67
0%
156 Olmsted 156 50 1 2%
192 Peforming Arts 75 4 5%
195 City Honors 62 1 2%
197 MST Prep 49 1 2%
198 International Prep 46
0%
200 Bennett  76 2 3%
204 Lafayette 72
0%
205 Riverside 74 2 3%
206 South Park 83
0%
212 da Vinci 30
0%
301 Burgard 63 2 3%
302 Emerson 36
0%
304 Hutch Tech 94
0%
305 McKinley 79
0%
307 East 69
0%
335
26 1 4%
131 Academy, grades 7-8 9
0%
131 Academy, Grades 9-12 16
0%

Total 3143 48 2%

 

- Mary Pasciak

facebook.com/mary.pasciak     twitter.com/SchoolZoneBlog    [email protected]

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About School Zone

Denise Jewell Gee

Denise Jewell Gee

Denise Jewell Gee joined The Buffalo News in 2007 and currently covers education and suburban schools. She also writes a column for the City & Region section and previously covered government in Erie County and Niagara Falls. Gee graduated from Boston University with degrees in journalism and political science.

@denisejewellgee | [email protected]


Tiffany Lankes

Tiffany Lankes

Tiffany Lankes joined The Buffalo News in 2013 and primarily covers the Buffalo Public Schools. She has written about education since 2003 at newspapers in Florida and New York. In 2008, she was a nominated finalist for The Pulitzer Prize. Lankes is an Amherst native and graduate of Sacred Heart Academy and Syracuse University. She started her journalism career writing for the News’ NeXt section.

@TiffanyLankes | [email protected]


Sandra Tan

Sandra Tan

Sandra Tan has been a cityside reporter for The Buffalo News since 2000 and currently covers the Buffalo Public Schools beat. She previously covered the Williamsville school district and was a full-time education reporter for five years prior to joining The News. She graduated from the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism.

@BNschoolzone | [email protected]


Deidre Williams

Deidre Williams

Deidre Williams began working for The Buffalo News in 1999 and currently covers Buffalo Public Schools. She formerly was a suburban reporter on the Northtowns beat and has been a cityside reporter covering communities since 2004. Williams has a mass communications degree from Towson University.

@DeidreWilliamsB | [email protected]

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